Archive for the ‘Medical Massage’ Category

Five Reasons You Have Tight Hamstrings

On his blog, Eric Cressey writes:

“There might not be a more obnoxious and stubborn athletic injury than the hamstrings strain.  When it is really bad, it can bother you when you’re simply walking or sitting on it.  Then, when a hamstrings strain finally feels like it’s getting better, you build up to near your top speed with sprinting – and it starts barking at you again.  In other words, a pulled hamstrings is like a crazy, unpredictable mother-in-law; just when you think you’ve finally won her over, she brings you back down to Earth and reminds you how much more she liked your wife’s old boyfriend.

However, not all hamstrings pain cases are true strains; more commonly, they present as a feeling of “tight hamstrings.”  If one is going to effective prevent this discomfort, rehabilitate it, or train around it, it’s important to realize what is causing the hamstrings tightness in the first place.”

Why might we have tight hamstrings?

1. Protective Tension of the Hamstrings

2. Neural Tension

3. Truly Tight Hamstrings

4. Previous Hamstrings Strain

5. Acute Hamstrings Strain or Tendinosis

Learn about the five reasons on Cressey’s blog at http://www.ericcressey.com/5-reasons-tight-hamstrin

 

Minding Your Mitochondria

At TEDx Iowa City, Dr. Terry Wahls speaks of her own experience with multiple sclerosis (MS) and how she overcame this “incurable” disease.

We are reminded of the words of Hippocrates in 400BC, “Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food.” Those words are just as true now as they were then . . . . perhaps even moreso.

 

Sophisticated Smiles

Yesterday, Amber met with the fabulous ladies at Sophisticated Smiles in Johnson City.  Dr. Angela Cameron’s dental practice is THE place to go in the Tri-Cities for aesthetic dentistry.  It was great to speak with these delightful women about how we may best serve those struggling with jaw pain.

If you’re looking for a dentist, you may wish to  try this office on for size.  They are extremely personable and offer complimentary consultations in their beautiful office.  Give them a call!

 

Dangerous Bill in TN Legislature

Bill Would Change Administrative Oversight of Tennessee State Massage Board

Sections 11 and 12 of House Bill 2387 and Senate Bill 2249, if passed, would move the Massage Licensure Board from Tennessee Department of Health to the Tennessee Department of Commerce.  On page 5 of the bill, Sections 11 and 12 would relocate Title 63-18, which is the Massage Licensure Act of 1995, from the Department of Health Related Boards (DHRB) to the Department of Commerce and Insurance (DCI).

The Department of Health Related Boards currently oversees all health professions while the Department of Commerce and Insurance oversees other professional licensing programs such as: electricians, plumbers, and real estate agents.

Massage therapy is a health profession. The current administrative oversight of DHRB has worked since the state first began licensing massage therapists; there is no reason to change what is working. The massage licensure board is self-funded from license fees so the proposed move would not save tax dollars, streamline state government, or reduce duplication of efforts. In fact, a change in administrative oversight would require an application and process shift to conform to a new department. There has been no reason given as to why the sponsors of this bill feel an oversight change is even needed.

Therapeutic massage is a health profession—not a trade—and massage therapists are health care providers.  Since 1995, our profession has been striving continually—and successfully—for recognition within the medical community.  Many massage therapists now work in healthcare environments, i.e. offices of physicians, physical therapists, chiropractors, and dentists.  Many are employed in hospitals, clinics, and nursing homes.  Furthermore, the massage profession should continue to be regulated within the Health Department in order to best protect the public from unsafe massage therapists.

We, together with the Associated Bodywork and Massage Professionals (ABMP), American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA), Tennessee Massage Therapy Association (TMTA), massage therapists and healthcare professionals statewide, are opposed to this section of HB 2387.  We encourage other healthcare professionals, our clients and patients to contact the sponsor of the bill and their representatives to voice opposition to Sections 11 and 12 of HB 2387. Contact them by email or phone or both.

The sponsor of HB 2387 is Representative Gerald McCormick, he can be reached at 615-741-2548 or rep.gerald.mccormick@capitol.tn.gov.

The bill has been referred to the Government Operations committeeRep. Jim Cobb serves as chair, Rep. Barrett Rich is vice-chair, and Rep. Tony Shipley is committee secretary.  Committee members also include Representatives Barbara Cooper, Craig Fitzhugh, Steve Hall, Julia Hurley, Mike Kernell, Debra Maggart, Judd Matheny, Gerald McCormick, & Mike Turner.  The committee can be reached at 615-741-4866.

The same bill on the Senate side of the General Assembly is SB 2249, sponsored by Senator Norris and Senator Bell.

Senator Mark Norris, sen.mark.norris@capitol.tn.gov or 615-741-1967

Senator Mike Bell, sen.mike.bell@capitol.tn.gov or 615-741-1946

Find your state legislator by going to http://www.capitol.tn.gov/legislators/

Read the Senate bill here:  http://www.capitol.tn.gov/Bills/107/Bill/SB2249.pdf or the House bill here:  http://www.abmp.com/downloads/2012_TN_HB2387.pdf.

To find your legislators contact info, go to:    http://www.legislature.state.tn.us/districtmaps/

 

Dr. Dean Ornish on Healing

“Instead of trying to motivate [patients] with the ‘fear of dying,’ Ornish reframes the issue. He inspires a new vision of the ‘joy of living’ — convincing them they can feel better, not just live longer.” ~ Fast Company

In an inspiring video from the TED lecture series, Dr. Dean Ornish shows us ways in which we can change ourselves. . . . Thereby leading happier, healthier & even longer lives.

 

Dr. Weil’s Recommendations for Wrist Pain

Dr. Weil’s recommendations for carpal tunnel syndrome self-care include:

  • rest
  • a certain vitamin
  • yoga
  • arnica gel
  • ice packs

Read his entire article at: http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02918/Carpal-Tunnel-Syndrome.html

 

Medicare Lymphedema Treatment Bill Introduced

H.R. 4662, “Lymphedema Diagnosis and Treatment Cost Saving Act of 2010,” was recently introduced in the Senate by Congressman Larry Kissell of North Carolina.  Ron Paul (R-TX14) was the first co-sponsor of the bill.  Phil Roe (R-TN1) is the second.

Please urge your local Congressmen and Senators to support this bill. Lymphedema is treatable, but proper treatment is extensive.  Passage of this bill would allow for many people to receive treatment for services that would not otherwise be covered by insurance.  When Medicare makes a change, private insurance companies usually follow suit.

Specific goals of the bill include:

  • to provide diagnosis and treatment of individuals with and at risk for lymphedema according to current medical treatment standards, including manual lymph drainage, compression bandages, garments, devices, and exercise
  • to enhance quality of lymphedema patient care by providing therapist qualification requirements
  • to provide for lymphedema patient education in the procedures for self-treatment so as to transfer the treatment from the clinical to the home setting
  • to encourage patient self-treatment plan adherence by providing necessary medical supplies for use at home
  • to expand patient access to qualified lymphedema therapy by extending coverage to qualified, trained lymphedema therapists who may practice under a qualified physician, physical therapist or occupational therapist.

Yes!  When this passes, lymphedema management at AMMA (manual lymph drainage, combined decongestive therapy, bandages & exercises) will be covered by insurance!

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As requested, we have included sample letters below.  You are welcome to use them as a blueprint for letters or emails to your Representatives and Senators. These letters only represent suggested verbiage. Please feel free to customize your letter in any way.

The bill is currently in the United States House of Representatives.  We have included two letters to representatives.  If you are a resident of Tennessee’s District 1, the please use the letter below to thank Representative Phil Roe for already taking action on the bill by becoming a co-sponsor.  If you are not one of Representative Roe’s constituents, please use the Congress Letter.  Next, please urge your state Senators to introduce and support a similar bill in the United States Senate.  A sample Senate Letter is also included.

Don’t know how to contact your Representatives?  Not even sure who they are?  Just enter your zip code to find out at http://www.contactingthecongress.org/.  It will link you to a page listing both your state senators and your district representatives to Congress.  From there, you may contact them via fax, phone, email or snail mail.

Sample Letter to Representative Roe:

Dear Representative Roe,

As your constituent, I am writing to thank you for signing on as a co-sponsor of H.R. 4662, the “Lymphedema Diagnosis and Treatment Cost Saving Act of 2010,” introduced by Congressman Larry Kissell on February 23, 2010. [Please list your credentials (if any) and any personal experience you may have with lymphedema (if any). Do you struggle with lymphedema? Does your mother? Son? Best friend? Are you a cancer survivor?]

Lymphedema is a medical condition affecting an estimated 2 million Medicare Beneficiaries. Secondary lymphedema sometimes results from surgery and curative radiation. H.R. 4662 is projected to save hundreds of millions of tax-payer dollars every year in avoidance of costs of treating preventable lymphedema-related cellulitis. This act will reduce Medicare costs while improving patient care and quality of life. It will also expand patient access to qualified lymphedema therapy by extending coverage to qualified, specially trained lymphedema therapists who may practice under a qualified physician, physical therapist or occupational therapist.

The clinically-proven treatment of lymphedema is called “complex decongestive therapy” and includes manual lymph drainage, appropriate bandaging and compression garments, specific therapeutic exercises and proper skin care. It is used world-wide by the medical community, is not experimental and has decades of proven success. Unfortunately, not all components of this treatment fall under categories for which Medicare or private insurance companies typically provide coverage. With treatment, a patient lives a long, healthy and virtually normal life. But without treatment, the disease can grow progressively worse, skyrocketing medical costs with hospitalizations and causing severe disfigurement, disability, pain, and in some cases even results in death.

Medicare has no requirement for special lymphedema training or competence on the part of the therapists treating lymphedema patients. Compression garments are a crucial part of treatment, yet insurance covers a fraction of the cost of both the garments and the treatments. Medicare does not cover the supplies and garments at all, despite a recent AHQR review that included garment use as standard treatment of this condition.

Thank you again for joining Representatives Larry Kissell (D-NC8) and Ron Paul (R-TX14) in publicly supporting this bill as a co-sponsor. “The Lymphedema Diagnosis and Treatment Cost Savings Act of 2010” will change lives.

Sincerely,

(Your Name)
(include your address here, even if you’re sending this by email)

Sample Congress Letter:

Dear Representative [Name],

As your constituent, I am writing to urge you to sign on as a primary or co-sponsor of H.R. 4662, the “Lymphedema Diagnosis and Treatment Cost Saving Act of 2010,” introduced by Congressman Larry Kissell on February 23, 2010. [Please list your credentials (if any) and any personal experience you may have with lymphedema (if any). Do you struggle with lymphedema? Does your mother? Son? Best friend? Are you a cancer survivor?]

As you may be unfamiliar with the disease, here is a link from the Lance Armstrong Foundation that explains the condition and its treatment: http://www.livestrong.org/site/c.khLXK1PxHmF/b.2660675/k.9471/Physical_Effects_Lymphedema.htm

Lymphedema is a medical condition affecting an estimated 2 million Medicare Beneficiaries. Secondary lymphedema sometimes results from surgery and curative radiation. H.R. 4662 is projected to save hundreds of millions of tax-payer dollars every year in avoidance of costs of treating preventable lymphedema-related cellulitis. This act will reduce Medicare costs while improving patient care and quality of life. It will also expand patient access to qualified lymphedema therapy by extending coverage to qualified, specially trained lymphedema therapists who may practice under a qualified physician, physical therapist or occupational therapist.

The clinically-proven treatment of lymphedema is called “complex decongestive therapy” and includes manual lymph drainage, appropriate bandaging and compression garments, specific therapeutic exercises and proper skin care. It is used world-wide by the medical community, is not experimental and has decades of proven success. Unfortunately, not all components of this treatment fall under categories for which Medicare or private insurance companies typically provide coverage. With treatment, a patient lives a long, healthy and virtually normal life. But without treatment, the disease can grow progressively worse, skyrocketing medical costs with hospitalizations and causing severe disfigurement, disability, pain, and in some cases even results in death.

Medicare has no requirement for special lymphedema training or competence on the part of the therapists treating lymphedema patients. Compression garments are a crucial part of treatment, yet insurance covers a fraction of the cost of both the garments and the treatments. Medicare does not cover the supplies and garments at all, despite a recent AHQR review that included garment use as standard treatment of this condition.

Please join Representatives Larry Kissell (D-NC8), Ron Paul (R-TX14), and Phil Roe (R-TN1) by publicly supporting this bill as a primary or co-sponsor. For additional information or to (co)sponsor this bill, contact Zach Pfister in Congressman Kissell’s office at zach.pfister@mail.house.gov or 202-225-3715.

Thank you for your help.

Sincerely,

(Your Name)
(include your address here, even if you’re sending this by email)

Sample Senate Letter:

Dear Senator [Name],

Congressman Larry Kissel of North Carolina is Sponsoring H.R. 4662, the “Lymphedema Diagnosis and Treatment Cost Saving Act of 2010.” This bill is projected to save hundreds of millions of tax-payer dollars every year by providing treatment to avoid preventable lymphedema-related complications. As your constituent, I urge you to sponsor an identical bill in the Senate.

[Please list your credentials (if any) and any personal experience you may have with lymphedema (if any).  Do you struggle with lymphedema?  Does your mother?  Son? Best friend?   Are you a cancer survivor?]

As you may be unfamiliar with the disease, here is a link from the Lance Armstrong Foundation that explains the condition and its treatment: http://www.livestrong.org/site/c.khLXK1PxHmF/b.2660675/k.9471/Physical_Effects_Lymphedema.htm

Lymphedema is a medical condition affecting an estimated 2 million Medicare Beneficiaries. Secondary lymphedema sometimes results from surgery and curative radiation. H.R. 4662 is projected to save hundreds of millions of tax-payer dollars every year in avoidance of costs of treating preventable lymphedema-related cellulitis. This act will reduce Medicare costs while improving patient care and quality of life. It will also expand patient access to qualified lymphedema therapy by extending coverage to qualified, specially trained lymphedema therapists who may practice under a qualified physician, physical therapist or occupational therapist.

The clinically-proven treatment of lymphedema is called “complex decongestive therapy” and includes manual lymph drainage, appropriate bandaging and compression garments, specific therapeutic exercises and proper skin care. It is used world-wide by the medical community, is not experimental and has decades of proven success. Unfortunately, not all components of this treatment fall under categories for which Medicare or private insurance companies typically provide coverage. With treatment, a patient lives a long, healthy and virtually normal life. But without treatment, the disease can grow progressively worse, skyrocketing medical costs with hospitalizations and causing severe disfigurement, disability, pain, and in some cases even results in death.

Medicare has no requirement for special lymphedema training or competence on the part of the therapists treating lymphedema patients. Compression garments are a crucial part of treatment, yet insurance covers a fraction of the cost of both the garments and the treatments. Medicare does not cover the supplies and garments at all, despite a recent AHQR review that included garment use as standard treatment of this condition.

I urge you to sponsor a bill in the Senate identical to H.R. 4662, and provide parity and adequate coverage for this disease. For additional information about the House bill, please contact Zach Pfister in Congressman Kissell’s office at zach.pfister@mail.house.gov or 202-225-3715.

Thank you for your help.

Sincerely,

(Your Name)
(include your address here, even if you’re sending this by email)

 

Dr. Oz Explains Trigger Points

When you have easy to reach trigger points that create problematic referral pain, we teach you to do this.  Self-care techniques are key to the recovery process!  Kudos to Dr. Oz for getting to word out that people can self-treat myofascial pain!


 

Spring 2010 Newsletter Now Available – “To Your Health”

The newest edition of our semiannual newsletter, “To Your Health” Spring 2010, is hot off the presses!

Featured articles include:

~ “The Benefits of Lymphatic Massage” – Cathy Ulrich
~ “No Pain, No Gain?” - Cathy Ulrich
~ “Massage for Seniors”

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You may download the newsletter or view it as an Adobe PDF file. The latest version of Adobe Reader is available for free download at http://get.adobe.com/reader/.

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The Dangers of Over-the-Counter Pain-Killers

When Antonio Benedi of Springfield, Va., felt a case of the flu coming on one weekend in February 1993, he did what millions of others do -- he reached for a common over-the-counter pain medication. I was taking Tylenol like I was supposed to, by the label, he said. A few days later the then 37-year-old Benedi was in a coma and in desperate need of a liver transplant. Collapse (AP Photo/Courtesy Antonio Benedi)

(AP Photo/Courtesy Antonio Benedi)

Many of the dear folks with whom we work have lived in pain for years.  As a result, over-the-counter meds can play a frequent role in our lives. . . .

While Tylenol certainly can be helpful, we need to remember to exercise caution when using over-the-counter medications.

Last year, the FDA linked normal acetaminophin use to liver damage and pushed for stronger warnings and stricter dose limits for drugs that, like Tylenol, contain acetaminophen.

When Antonio Benedi (right) of Springfield, Va., felt a case of the flu coming on one weekend in February 1993, he did what millions of others do — he reached for a common over-the-counter pain medication. “I was taking Tylenol like I was supposed to, by the label,” he said. A few days later the then 37-year-old in a coma and in dire need of a liver transplant.

Read the whole story at ABC news:

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/PainNews/story?id=7699582